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Organization Design powered by Evolution

Bernard Marie CHIQUET is a multi-Entrepreneur and was Senior Partner/Senior Executive in large organizations for 15 years (Ernst&Young, Capgemini, Volkswagen). He founded the Integral Governance Institute 7 years ago and is a European Leader in the practice of Holacracy. Bernard Marie believes that in order to evolve and address our current issues, we must first change the core organizational structure so that we can ...more »

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Stoosian Emergent Organizational Practices from the wild

To implement the stoosian idea of management, we need new management practices. I'm refraining from using the term "best practices", because there is no such thing in a complex environment - we continuously need to reinvent and adapt them. At it-agile, we continuously experiment on how to run a company in an even more self-organized way. See http://stefanroock.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/it-agile-state-of-play/ for a ...more »

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Indicators for Companies Culture and How to Change

I think there is much talk about companies strategie and vision all the time in many companies. But there is little talk about companies culture. Why is this? Because culture is much more difficult to state and to change than strategy. I think, the stoosian ideas are much about changing company cultures and thus I propose, to discuss the following questions in a session: 1. How can a companies culture be described (and ...more »

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Management is dead! Grasping the new model & methods for change

Management, the organization technology, is based on fundamental principles that we inherited from the industrial age. Those principles were good enough for that time and indeed led to fantastic increases in efficiency in the past. Today, however, these principles prove toxic and stand in the way of motivation, effectiveness, innovation, success, and indeed work. In ths session, the aim is to understand and reflect upon ...more »

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Organize for Complexity. How to make work work again

In this session, we will discuss the urgency and the vision for organizations to become truly robust for complexity, as well as fit for human beings, in order to make work work again for the individual, and for organizations as a whole. We will also discuss how that can be done, from the point of view of internal and external change agents. INTRODUCTION. The notion of dividing an organization into functions, and ...more »

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Guided Self-Organisation: Creating a Learning Network

The Stoos Network has identified a core believe of “learning networks of people creating value.” But, how to you make this happen in organizations? This session proposes the lowest-effort/highest-impact functionality to make it happen. About 10 years ago and coming from a slightly different perspective, we did root cause analysis. It identified 42 common issues. Among those were: colleagues could not find the information ...more »

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Gamification of the working environment

More and more people consider fun as being an important reason to choose one job over the other. Next to that it is well known that results are better when employees are having fun at what they do. In other words, fun at work improves employee satisfaction and positively contributes to the results. This imposes a new challenge for management, making the workplace fun. During this session I would like to talk about different ...more »

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Can We Rate Organizations on Intrinsic Motivation?

A number of media and institutes have different ways of rating the "best organizations to work for". But many of them include external motivators, such as the size of pay-checks and bonuses. And most of them publish a "top X companies", which means only big companies end up on the list. Can we come up with a different way of "rating" organizations? Can we come up with criteria to measure _any_ organization, instead ...more »

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Alternatives for Status, Power and Money

Status and power are two of the 10 intrinsic motivators in the "champfrogs" scale. We cannot deny that some people are intrinsically motivated by status and power. These people will, quite naturally, enjoy their high positions in a corporate hierarchy. In fact, such hierarchies *attract* people with such intrinsic motivation. We also cannot deny that some people are (extrinsically) motivated by large sums of money. It ...more »

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The 10 Worst Management Practices, And How To Turn Them Around

In this 90-minute session, we (Fabian Schiller & Laurens Bonnema) propose to collect management practices that are exactly the opposite of the stoosian idea of management, as observed in the wild, i.e. no theoretical wrongs, but only those that we have actually seen in real life. In a next step it would be interesting to try to evaluate why those practices are used and how they can be replaced by more stoosian practices ...more »

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Facilitating effective interventions from within organizations

Trying to introduce a new solution approach from the outside into a large and complex organisation is quite a challenge, isn’t it? Well-intended initiatives get stuck early on as the parties involved point to each other instead of getting into a constructive dialog. This session shows how you can facilitate parties to get from pointing to each other to a constructive dialog and identifying effective solutions. The ...more »

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From Overwhelming Complexity to Effective Simplicity

Which large organisation isn’t impacted by crippling bureaucracy and overwhelming complexity? Whatever has been tried, the results remain disappointing. Yet, the breakthrough knowledge appears to be available today. The knowledge is, however, too distributed, lacks alignment with how human beings/organisations think and act, and it misses a vital ingredient: Integration of the solution elements into one overall solution ...more »

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